Meningococcal Nursing Assignment.

Meningococcal Nursing Assignment.

Definition
Cause of the disease
Need to know
Overview: Some people are at a high risk of contracting meningococcal disease. The risks involve travel, age, community setting, and certain medical conditions (Ghebrehewet, Conrad & Marsh, (2016).

b. Meningococcal vaccination: several vaccines are available to children and adults
Transmission: The disease is causes by Neisseria Meningitides. It is classified as airborne disease because it is transmitted through kissing or coughing.
Signs & symptoms: The disease present the signs and symptoms of flu-illness, and can have additional signs such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, altered mental status, among others (Tsang & Taha, 2016) Meningococcal Nursing Assignment.
Prevention: Vaccines and antibiotics appear to be the most effective (Pollard, Feavers & Cohn, 2016).
Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4)
9 months to 55 years Menactra
2 years old to 55 years old Menveo
Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4)
Serogroup B Meningococcal B

Treatment: Treatment is mainly based on the use of antibiotics (Nadel & Carcillo, 2016)
Conclusion

References
Brandtzaeg, P. (2006). Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Invasive Meningococcal Disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease, 427-480. doi:10.1002/3527608508.ch21
Ghebrehewet, S., Conrad, D., & Marsh, G. (2016). Meningitis and meningococcal disease. Oxford Medicine Online. doi:10.1093/med/9780198745471.003.0011
Nadel, S., & Carcillo, J. (2016). Treatment of meningococcal disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease Management, 75-90. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28119-3_6
Pollard, A. J., Feavers, I., & Cohn, A. (2016). Prevention of meningococcal disease through vaccination. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease Management, 91-103. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28119-3_7
Tsang, R., & Taha, M. (2016). Diagnosis of meningococcal disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease Management, 45-55. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28119-3_4
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Definition
Cause of the disease
Need to know
Overview: Some people are at a high risk of contracting meningococcal disease. The risks involve travel, age, community setting, and certain medical conditions (Ghebrehewet, Conrad & Marsh, (2016). Meningococcal Nursing Assignment.

b. Meningococcal vaccination: several vaccines are available to children and adults
Transmission: The disease is causes by Neisseria Meningitides. It is classified as airborne disease because it is transmitted through kissing or coughing.
Signs & symptoms: The disease present the signs and symptoms of flu-illness, and can have additional signs such as fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, altered mental status, among others (Tsang & Taha, 2016)
Prevention: Vaccines and antibiotics appear to be the most effective (Pollard, Feavers & Cohn, 2016).
Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4)
9 months to 55 years Menactra
2 years old to 55 years old Menveo
Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4)
Serogroup B Meningococcal B

Treatment: Treatment is mainly based on the use of antibiotics (Nadel & Carcillo, 2016)
Conclusion. Meningococcal Nursing Assignment.

References
Brandtzaeg, P. (2006). Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Invasive Meningococcal Disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease, 427-480. doi:10.1002/3527608508.ch21
Ghebrehewet, S., Conrad, D., & Marsh, G. (2016). Meningitis and meningococcal disease. Oxford Medicine Online. doi:10.1093/med/9780198745471.003.0011
Nadel, S., & Carcillo, J. (2016). Treatment of meningococcal disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease Management, 75-90. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28119-3_6
Pollard, A. J., Feavers, I., & Cohn, A. (2016). Prevention of meningococcal disease through vaccination. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease Management, 91-103. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28119-3_7
Tsang, R., & Taha, M. (2016). Diagnosis of meningococcal disease. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease Management, 45-55. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-28119-3_4